Crew

/crew/apted.jpg

Michael Apted

Director
IMDb Profile

Biography from Leonard Maltin's Movie Encyclopedia:

Talented filmmaker whose sensitivity to characters and their environments is evident in both his fiction films and documentaries. Apted studied law and history at Cambridge University, then worked at Granada Television as a researcher. Within a few years, he became a prominent and versatile TV director, winning several British Emmys for his work and compiling scores of credits. He made his feature debut with Triple Echo (1973) and scored a hit with Stardust (1975), which chronicled-with uncanny believability-the rise of a Beatles-like music group. After The Squeeze (1977) and the intriguing Agatha (1979), Apted had his first international hit with Coal Miner's Daughter (1980), the biography of country singer Loretta Lynn, which won Sissy Spacek a Best Actress Oscar.

Since then Apted has tackled a variety of films, but tries to alternate Hollywood movies with smaller, more personal projects and documentaries. His credits include Continental Divide (1981), Kipperbang (1982), Gorky Park (1983), Firstborn (1984), Bring on the Night (1985), Critical Condition (1987), Gorillas in the Mist (1988), Class Action (1991), Thunderheart and its documentary companion piece, Incident at Oglala (both 1992), and Nell (1994). But Apted's most remarkable achievement remains his unique series of documentaries-7 Up, 7 Plus 7, 21, 28 Up and 35 Up-which have followed the lives of 14 Britons since the age of seven-in seven-year increments.

 
 
/crew/barry.jpg

John Barry

Composer
IMDb Profile

"He's never satisfied with what he does. Every day he wakes up and believes that into his mind and soul is going to come some magical arrangement of notes that he's going to ultimately either entrance you with in a concert hall or cinema. It's because he thinks there's still a peak to climb that he's a great film composer." Sir Richard Attenborough eloquently explains what so many other directors feel about working with John Barry. Their success together in 1992 with Chaplin (1992) is a superb example of what his music does for a motion picture. Robert Downey Junior's portrayal of the comic legend is given a tragic soul by the score; an element "Dickie" never dreamt of. The result (nominated for an Oscar) is but one of Barry's magical arrangement of notes. More...

 
 
/crew/bb.jpg

Barbara Broccoli

Producer
IMDb Profile

Barbara Broccoli is the head of development for the Cubby Broccoli company Danjaq, Inc. She has also worked in the production and casting departments at Eon Productions for a number of years. GoldenEye marked her first film as a producer on the Bond films. Broccoli has previously worked in different capacities on earlier Bond adventures. She was an assistant director on Octopussy and A View to a Kill. She then became the associate producer (with Tom Pevsner) on the last two Bond adventures, The Living Daylights and Licence to Kill. Prior to starting her career, Broccoli earned her degree from Loyola University in Los Angeles, California, where she majored in motion picture and television communications. Since producing GoldenEye with her step-brother, she went on to produce Tomorrow Never Dies, The World is Not Enough, and is now working on the yet to be titled Bond 20.

 
 
/crew/cubby.jpg

Albert R. Broccoli

Producer
IMDb Profile

Albert R. Broccoli was the legendary filmmaker who brought the James Bond movies to the big screen, and produced 17 box-office smash hits from 1962-1995. Albert Romolo Broccoli was born in New York City on April 5th, 1909. Growing up in Long Island, Broccoli worked on the family farm. His early ancestors in Italy crossed cauliflower with Italian rabe to create the green vegetable that has their family name. One of his cousins gave him the nickname of "Cubby" after a comic strip character. In 1938, Broccoli became an assistant director at 20th Century Fox Pictures. During the early 1950s, he moved to London, England, where he started Warwick Pictures with his partner Irving Allen.

His first job as a film producer came in 1953. The movie had starred Alan Ladd and was titled Red Beret in England. In the United States, the film was known as Paratrooper. He was by then a powerful figure in show business. Billionaire Howard Hughes befriended him, and Cary Grant was best man at his wedding. Broccoli was a longtime fan of Ian Fleming's spy novels, but his big break came when he and his partner Harry Saltzman started Eon Productions Limited and convinced United Artists to put up $1 million for the 1962 film adaptation of Dr. No, his first installment in the 007 saga. Broccoli has been credited with developing the Bond recipe for success -- exotic locations, colorful villains, dazzling gadgetry and beautiful, scantily clad women. Outside the Bond genre, Broccoli's other films included Fire Down Below, The Trials of Oscar Wilde and Chitty Chitty Bang Bang. More...

 
 
/crew/glen.jpg

John Glen

Editor,Director
IMDb Profile

A former film editor and second unit director, Glen has carved his niche in action pictures. His first credit was on the James Bond flick "On Her Majesty's Secret Service" (1969). Other credits as film editor include Peter Yates' "Murphy's War" (1970), the trial drama "Conduct Unbecoming" (1975) and the Bond films "The Spy Who Loved Me" (1977) and "Moonraker" (1979), both directed by Lewis Gilbert. He moved to the director's chair with "For Your Eyes Only" (1981), which eschewed much of the gadgetry and cartoon style of the previous entries in the series. Glen serviceably directed four more Bond films "Octopussy" (1983), "A View to a Kill" (1985), "The Living Daylights" (1987) and "Licence to Kill" (1989). Since abandoning the Bond franchise, he has overseen "Aces: Iron Eagle III" and the unsuccessful "Christopher Columbus: The Discovery" (both 1992).

 
 
/crew/mgw.jpg

Michael G. Wilson

Producer, Writer
IMDb Profile

Michael G. Wilson has enjoyed a long association with the record-breaking James Bond film franchise. He first earned his producing stripes as the executive producer on Moonraker and went on to serve in the same capacity on For Your Eyes Only and Octopussy. He produced (with Albert R. Broccoli) three Bond films A View to a Kill, The Living Daylights and Licence to Kill. Wilson's creative contribution to these films extends beyond his producing duties. He also co-wrote the screenplays for all of the aforementioned Agent 007 action adventures, except Moonraker. A native New Yorker, Wilson studied law at Stanford University, later becoming a partner at a prestigious Washington, D.C./New York law firm, specializing in international taxation.

In 1972, he joined Eon Productions in a legal/administrative capacity. He was named assistant to the producer on The Spy Who Loved Me. In addition to his work on motion pictures, Wilson is also interested in still photography. He is recognized as a leading expert on early photography and loans his extensive collection of rare photos to museums, galleries and exhibitions around the world. Michael G. Wilson now heads Eon Productions Limited and produces the new Bond films with his step-sister, Barbara. The two have produced GoldenEye, Tomorrow Never Dies, and The World is Not Enough together, and are hard at work on the untitled Bond 20 film.

 
 
/crew/norman.jpg

Monty Norman

Composer
IMDb Profile

Monty Norman began his career as a singer with the leading British big bands of the late 50s and early 60s (Cyril Stapleton, Stanley Black, Ted Heath) and graduated to being a solo performer on stage, records and television. He wrote pop songs for himself and other artists, and when one of his songs, FALSE HEARTED LOVER, became an international hit he began thinking seriously of becoming a full-time composer. The decision was made for him when his first musical, EXPRESSO BONGO, became a West End hit and the offers started flowing in. More...

 
 
/crew/saltzman.jpg

Harry Saltzman

Producer
IMDb Profile

Based in Britain, Saltzman produced the well-received social dramas Look Back in Anger (1959) and Saturday Night and Sunday Morning (1960) before embarking on the series that would make his fame (and fortune): the James Bond movies. He collaborated with Albert R. Broccoli from 1962 to 1974 in producing Dr. No (1962), Goldfinger (1964), and Diamonds Are Forever (1971).

 
 
/crew/spottiswoode.jpg

Roger Spottiswoode

Director
IMDb Profile

The son of film theoretician Raymond Spottiswoode, British-born Roger Spottiswoode served as an editing trainee on "Georgy Girl" (1996), then worked as an editor of documentaries and TV commercials prior to cutting three Sam Peckinpah films, "Straw Dogs" (1971), The Getaway" (1972) and "Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid" (1973). He also edited Karel Reisz's "The Gambler" (1974) and Walter Hill's "Hard Times" (1975) and would reteam with each again, associate producing Reisz's "Who'll Stop the Rain" (1977) and co-scripting (with Hill and Larry Gross) Hill's blockbuster Eddie Murphy-Nick Nolte hit "48 Hrs." (1982). Spottiswoode made his directorial debut with "Terror Train" in 1980, and for his second effort, "The Pursuit of D B Cooper" (1981), began an association with screenwriter Ron Shelton that would span three films, including the taut political drama "Under Fire" (1983). He developed into an adaptable, competent Hollywood director of mainstream films such as "Shoot to Kill" (1988) "Turner and Hooch" (1989) and "Air America" (1990) and also helmed his share of TV-movies, perhaps most notably the Emmy-winning "And the Band Played On" (HBO, 1993), based on Randy Shilts' bestseller about the early years of the AIDS epidemic.

Along with Koreyoshi Kurahara, Spottiswoode directed the ambitious docudrama miniseries "Hiroshima" (1995) for Showtime, combining recently uncovered footage, newsreels, armed forces clips and dramatized encounters with the leading figures of the time to give a mesmerizing account of the events leading up to the dropping of the atomic bomb. Told from both sides, this Canadian-Japanese venture was actually two separate, interwoven films, with Kurahara handling the Japanese point of view (in Japanese with subtitles) and Spottiswoode taking the Allied part. 1997 then saw him at the helm of "Tomorrow Never Dies", another installment of the popular James Bond series.

 
 
/crew/young.jpg

Terence Young

Director
IMDb Profile

Began his career as a screenwriter in the mid-1930s and, following WWII service, made his fiction directorial debut with "One Night With You" (1948). Young directed a number of routine British action films before hitting his stride in the 1960s with a series of James Bond extravaganzas, beginning with "Dr. No" (1962). His recent credits include "Inchon" (1982), one of the biggest commercial disasters in the history of cinema.