Gustav Graves: King of Diamonds

On his flight back to London in Die Another Day (2002), James Bond reads the Gustav Graves cover article of the in-flight British Airways magazine High Life. Check out the transcript of the rather neat article below the pictures and after the jump. It details some interesting facts about Graves’ life.

James Bond's British Airways flight in Die Another Day (2002)
James Bond’s British Airways flight in Die Another Day (2002)
James Bond (Pierce Brosnan) is served a vodka martini by a flight attendant (Sir Roger Moore's daughter Deborah Moore) in Die Another Day (2002)
James Bond (Pierce Brosnan) is served a vodka martini by a flight attendant (Sir Roger Moore’s daughter Deborah Moore) in Die Another Day (2002)
James Bond (Pierce Brosnan) checks out High Life Magazine in Die Another Day (2002)
James Bond (Pierce Brosnan) checks out High Life Magazine in Die Another Day (2002)
The High Life Gustav Graves article, transcribed below
The High Life Gustav Graves article, transcribed below

GUSTAV GRAVES
King of Diamonds
The fast-living, sky-diving, car-racing, rapier-wielding gem tycoon tells Gregg Wilson why he’ll sleep when he’s dead

Charm, obsessive determination, and an awareness of his own good luck: the qualities that make Gustav Graves larger than life. The witty and flamboyant tycoon is a self made hero, having built his massive diamond empire on extremely modest foundations. He is currenty using the profits of his good fortune to fund numerous large-scale humanitarian projects, all for the sake of improving the environment, and revitalizing the British economy to boot. “Money is merely a tool for bringing about change. As I see it, there is no higher purpose than working to improve the quality of life – for all living things.” explained Graves in a recent interview. His words are an understatement. Graves’ corporation has become a model “Green” company, and his double “G” logo a seal of approval synonymous with environmental protection.

Perhaps his humble beginnings are responsible for his exceptional generosity. In fact, his life story reads more like a fairy-tale than a traditional biography. Orphaned at a young age, he spent his earliest days working in the diamond mines of Argentina . After obtaining a degree in engineering he devoted several years to geological research. It was during this time period, travelling the world and collecting data, that he discovered his diamond vein in Iceland. Within a year he had set up a fully automated mine, to efficiently excavate the volcanic ground while recycling the by-products. Built in typical Gustav Graves extravagance, the construction is housed within a mammoth bio-dome: a conservatory for one of the world’s largest collections of tropical plants. Today, the mine and its enchanted garden has become a star attraction for those tourists adventurous enough to travel beyond the Vatnajökull glacier to get there.

It must be Graves’ adventurous spirit that made him decide to base his center of operations in the remote region of south-east Iceland. But this is hardly surprising to anyone who knows him. The public image of Graves is an accurate one: he is an action-business man with a lust for dare-devil challenges and nerves of steel. Time and time again he has proved that no personal risk is too great. It is as if his professional achievements were only a sideline to his real purpose in life as an extreme athelete (sic). He routinely performs dangerous stunts with enthralling coolness. He skydives from his private helicopter, competes in cliff-diving competitions in Sri Lanka, embarks on round-the-world ballooning voyages, races cars in Monaco, and is currently attempting to break the land speed record on ice. Oh, and in his spare time, he’s training for a spot on the British Olympic fencing team. Where does he find the time to live so many parallel lives? He claims to never need sleep. “It’s a waste of life, as far as I’m concerned. I’ll get plenty of rest when I’m dead” is his brusque response.

It’s no wonder Gustav Graves is dominating the limelight of the English press these days. With rumours about how he’s about to revitalize the British Space program and gossip afoot of an imminent knighthood it is hardly surprising that he’s constantly flanked by a crowd of journalists. And why not? We love this man and we want to bear his every word; his philosophies are real and his aphorisms have pith. After all, we need a new hero, and Gustav Graves is it.

“DIAMONDS ARE FOREVER, BUT LIFE ISN’T. I INTEND TO MAKE A MARK WITH MINE.”

Note: The author of the article (Gregg Wilson) is a crew member that has worked on various James Bond movies including Die Another Day, Casino Royale, Skyfall and Spectre.